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NanoManufacturing

Michael De Volder, Engineering Department - IfM
 

Wed 01 Mar 14:30: Title to be confirmed

Title to be confirmed

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Wed 22 Feb 14:30: Title to be confirmed

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Thu 19 Jan 13:00: Title to be confirmed

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 19:43
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Wed 15 Mar 14:30: Title to be confirmed First Year PhD Report

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 15:25
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

First Year PhD Report

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Wed 25 Jan 15:00: Title to be confirmed First Year PhD Report

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 13:44
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

First Year PhD Report

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Fri 03 Mar 14:00: The chase for fluid-structure interaction effects – An obsession or something important?

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 13:06
The chase for fluid-structure interaction effects – An obsession or something important?

One of the scientific challenges during extreme fluid-structure dynamics is the rigorous description of the loading, its distribution, and the influence of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) effects. Until now, it has been assumed that the loading could be obtained from point-wise measurements on massive, non-deformable structures. We lack the measurement techniques to determine the full-field surface pressures and the FSI effects during large deformations in the structure. In this talk, we will take a walk through the experimental and numerical frameworks developed at SIM Lab, NTNU (https://www.ntnu.edu/kt/simlab) to study FSI effects on plated structures. The talk is mainly oriented towards studies involving blast-like loading conditions using a shock tube facility. Special focus will be placed on some scientific findings on the effect of FSI on the response of blast loaded steel plates. The talk will also include a brief discussion on how micro-architectured materials can be studied in these frameworks. We will close with a short discussion on the next steps towards developing novel methodologies and science-driven tools to quantify the surface pressures acting on plated structures during extreme loading events.

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Wed 01 Mar 14:30: Title to be confirmed

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 11:14
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Abstract not available

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Wed 25 Jan 14:30: Title to be confirmed First Year PhD Report

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 11:08
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

First Year PhD Report

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Thu 15 Dec 11:00: Scalable simulation and inference in non-Gaussian stochastic PDEs

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 11:04
Scalable simulation and inference in non-Gaussian stochastic PDEs

This talk presents early results along a path to scalable approximate inference schemes in large spatiotemporal models, such as weather or molecular dynamics simulations. Specifically, we’ll show how existing heuristics for scaling physical models such as coarse grids or mutli-scale temporal models can be learned automatically as auxiliary variables in variational posteriors. We’ll also demonstrate a new contribution to parallelizing adaptive SPDE solvers, allowing stateless sampling of entire Brownian sheets of any dimension. Finally, we’ll show how to extend stochastic variational inference in SDEs to include arbitrary jump processes.

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Thu 02 Mar 14:00: Gene expression dynamics during the awakening of the zygotic genome Host - Erik Clark

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 10:13
Gene expression dynamics during the awakening of the zygotic genome

Abstract not available

Host - Erik Clark

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Thu 23 Feb 14:00: Mechanisms initiating neural differentiation Host – Lara Busby

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Wed, 07/12/2022 - 10:12
Mechanisms initiating neural differentiation

Abstract not available

Host – Lara Busby

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Wed 01 Feb 14:00: Title to be confirmed

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Tue, 06/12/2022 - 11:49
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Abstract not available

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Thu 26 Jan 13:10: Unlocking the power of cell therapy to reverse disease Grab some lunch from the Darwin servery and enjoy an interesting science talk and discussion over lunch (talk starts 13.10, so make sure you're seated by then). Looking forward to...

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Mon, 05/12/2022 - 15:41
Unlocking the power of cell therapy to reverse disease

Abstract not available

Grab some lunch from the Darwin servery and enjoy an interesting science talk and discussion over lunch (talk starts 13.10, so make sure you're seated by then). Looking forward to seeing you there.

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Thu 19 Jan 13:10: Rapid decarbonisation of the NHS Grab some lunch from the Darwin servery and enjoy an interesting science talk and discussion over lunch (talk starts 13.10, so make sure you're seated by then). Looking forward to seeing you there.

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Mon, 05/12/2022 - 09:55
Rapid decarbonisation of the NHS

Targets for decarbonisation of healthcare are not static but being moved closer as climate change worsens. In this talk I will present a proposal for a new research programme we are developing to understand how very rapid decarbonisation, at a timescale of months to years, might differ from change over years to decades. We will be using an ‘Engineering Better Care’ approach to understand this challenge. We will particularly focus on mapping levers of change and understanding how to optimise health and equity outcome alongside rapid decarbonisation. We will be learning from the transformations seen in the NHS during the COVID pandemic.

Grab some lunch from the Darwin servery and enjoy an interesting science talk and discussion over lunch (talk starts 13.10, so make sure you're seated by then). Looking forward to seeing you there.

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Fri 09 Dec 15:00: Instabilities in kirigami structures

http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/rss/5408 - Mon, 05/12/2022 - 09:35
Instabilities in kirigami structures

Kirigami, an ancient Japanese art of paper cutting, inspires new ways to tailor the morphology and the mechanics of thin elastic sheets. It has been found to be of special relevance to applications in reconfigurable structures (e.g., large deployable structures) and microstructures (e.g., stretchable graphene sheets). Indeed, careful tailoring of cut patterns results in structures with interesting non-linear macroscopic responses emerging from local instabilities. In this presentation, we will discuss local effects in Kirigami by focusing our attention on the study of the deformation of a thin sheet with a single cut—i.e., the most basic and fundamental geometric building block of Kirigami. We will also discuss a new phenomenon that arises when kirigami sheets interact with a liquid substrate, namely elastocapillary kirigami. We study the effects of a liquid foundation and how it changes the nature of the local instabilities. Our analysis reveals that post-buckling configurations displays two types of a phase transitions: continuous (second order phase transition), which suggests a uniform phase; and a discontinuous transition (first order), leading to a phase propagation through kirigami structures.

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Flash recycling of graphite anodes

Abstract

The ever-increasing production of commercial lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) will result in a staggering accumulation of waste when they reach their end of life. A closed-loop solution, with effective recycling of spent LIBs, will lessen both the environmental impacts and economic cost of their use. Presently, <5% of spent LIBs are recycled and the regeneration of graphite anodes has, unfortunately, been mostly overlooked despite the considerable cost of battery-grade graphite. Here, we develop an ultrafast flash recycling method to regenerate the graphite anode and recover valuable battery metal resources. Selective Joule heating is applied for only seconds to efficiently decompose the resistive impurities. The generated inorganic salts, including lithium, cobalt, nickel, and manganese, can be easily recollected from the flashed anode waste using diluted acid, specifically 0.1 M HCl. The flash-recycled anode preserves the graphite structure and is coated with a solid-electrolyte-interphase-derived carbon shell, contributing to high initial specific capacity, superior rate performance and cycling stability, when compared to anode materials recycled using a high-temperature-calcination method. Life-cycle-analysis relative to current graphite production and recycling methods indicate that flash recycling can significantly reduce the total energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission while turning anode recycling into an economically advantageous process.

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Tube‐Sponge‐Inspired hierarchical electrocatalysts with boosted mass and electron transfer for efficient oxygen evolution

Abstract

Hindered gas bubble release and limited electron conducting process represent the major bottlenecks for large scale electrochemical water splitting. Both the desorption of bubbles and continuous electron transport are achievable on the surfaces of biomimetic catalytic materials by designing multiscale structural hierarchy. Inspired by the tubular structures of the deep-sea sponges, we fabricated an exceptionally active and binder-free porous nickel tube arrays (PNTA) decorated with NiFe-Zn2+-pore nanosheets (NiFe-PZn). The PNTA facilitated removal of bubbles and electron transfer in oxygen evolution reaction by reproducing trunks of the sponges, and simultaneously, the NiFe-PZn increase the number of catalytic active sites by simulating the sponge epidermis. With improved external mass transfer and interior electron transfer, the hierarchical NiFe-PZn@PNTA electrode exhibits superior oxygen evolution reaction performance with an overpotential of 172 mV at 10 mA∙cm−2 (with a Tafel slope of 50 mV∙dec−1). Furthermore, this electrocatalytic system recorded excellent reaction stability over 360 hours with constant current density of 100 mA∙cm−2 at the potential of 1.52 V (versus RHE). This work provides a new strategy of designing hierarchical electrocatalysts for highly efficient water splitting.

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